Chris Evans and Aaron Taylor-Johnson attend the Marvel Studios panel during Comic-Con International 2014 at San Diego

moj3nks For you my dear!

Chris Evans and Aaron Taylor-Johnson attend the Marvel Studios panel during Comic-Con International 2014 at San Diego

moj3nks For you my dear!

To encourage is greater than to be encouraged. Just as it’s better to give than to receive, you feel better about yourself when encouraging others.

Marc Phun (via marcphun)


"You provide the fire and I’ll provide the sacrifice. You provide the Spirit and I will open up inside." 

"You provide the fire and I’ll provide the sacrifice. You provide the Spirit and I will open up inside." 

sonofhislove:

If we do what we do to glorify God we won’t be afraid of what people think because we’re not doing it to receive praise from men, but to give honor to our Father.

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.
Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.
Scheduling tips
If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)
Zoom Info
mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.
Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.
Scheduling tips
If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)
Zoom Info
mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.
Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.
Scheduling tips
If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)
Zoom Info
mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.
Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.
Scheduling tips
If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)
Zoom Info
mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.
Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.
Scheduling tips
If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)
Zoom Info
mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.
Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.
Scheduling tips
If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)
Zoom Info

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.

  1. Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
  2. List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
  3. On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
  4. Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.

Scheduling tips

  • If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
  • Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
  • Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
  • If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
  • Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
  • If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
  • Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 

Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.

I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)